St. Vincent de Paul Dayton https://stvincentdayton.org Tue, 24 Mar 2020 14:20:21 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.5.1 https://secureservercdn.net/50.62.174.113/042.5ad.myftpupload.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/cropped-favicon-1-32x32.png St. Vincent de Paul Dayton https://stvincentdayton.org 32 32 Vincentian Reflections: September 20, 2020 https://stvincentdayton.org/vincentian-reflections-september-20-2020/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=vincentian-reflections-september-20-2020 Sun, 20 Sep 2020 10:00:16 +0000 https://stvincentdayton.org/?p=7330 Gospel: (Matthew 20:1-16) Jesus told his disciples this parable: “The kingdom of heaven is like a landowner who went out at dawn to hire laborers for his vineyard. After agreeing with them for the usual daily wage, he sent them into his vineyard….When it was evening the owner of the vineyard said to his foreman, […]

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Gospel: (Matthew 20:1-16)

Jesus told his disciples this parable: “The kingdom of heaven is like a landowner who went out at dawn to hire laborers for his vineyard. After agreeing with them for the usual daily wage, he sent them into his vineyard….When it was evening the owner of the vineyard said to his foreman, ‘Summon the laborers and give them their pay, beginning with the last and ending with the first.’ When those who had started about five o’clock came, each received the usual daily wage. So when the first came, they thought that they would receive more, but each of them also got the usual wage. And on receiving it they grumbled against the landowner, saying, ‘These last ones worked only one hour, and you have made them equal to us, who bore the day’s burden and heat.’ He said to them, ‘My friend, I am not cheating you. Did you not agree with me for the usual daily wage?…What if I wish to give this last one the same as you? Or am I not free to do as I wish with my own money? Are you envious because I am generous?’ Thus, the last will be first, and the first will be last.” 

Reflection: 

We all put off to the eleventh hour some piece of work that we have to do with respect to God or each other: prayer, forgiveness, charity, justice, etc.)  If this parable teaches us something about how great God is and how generous, then we are called to this same greatness and generosity.  Wouldn’t nations be different if debts could be forgiven and those who have were generous to those who have not?  Wouldn’t families be different if hurtful behavior ceased and was forgiven generously?  Wouldn’t individuals be different if we measured another only by his or her goodness? The landowner says to his grumbling laborers, “Are you envious because I am generous?” God’s generosity with us goes far beyond any measurement by human standards.   (Living Liturgy, p. 240)

Vincentian Meditation: 

St. Vincent knew himself to be sustained by God’s motherly and fatherly love. He could not conceive of a harsh and dreadful God. From his boyhood, he had prayed to the all-merciful, warm, and loving Father of Jesus, an Abba (Daddy) who called all of his children beloved. Vincent rested and warmed himself in God’s parental care and protection. Compassion, in Vincent’s view, was God’s name. Vincent once wrote: “God will take the place of father and mother for you. He will be your consolation, your virtue, and in the end the recompense of your love.(McKenna, Praying with Vincent, p.30-31.) 

Discussion:  (Share your thoughts on the readings after a moment of silence)

How have you experienced the “motherly and fatherly love” of God?

Closing Prayer:                                                                    

God, our father, give us generous hearts,

-help us to find a way to peace and forgiveness.

God, our mother, give us compassionate hearts,

-help us to be merciful and loving.   Amen

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Vincentian Reflections: September 13, 2020 https://stvincentdayton.org/vincentian-reflections-september-13-2020/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=vincentian-reflections-september-13-2020 Sun, 13 Sep 2020 10:00:42 +0000 https://stvincentdayton.org/?p=7328 Gospel: (Matthew 18:21-35)  Peter approached Jesus and asked him, “Lord, if my brother sins against me, how often must I forgive?  As many as seven times?”  Jesus answered, “I say to you, not seven times but seventy-seven times.  That is why the kingdom of heaven may be likened to a king who decided to settle […]

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Gospel: (Matthew 18:21-35) 

Peter approached Jesus and asked him, “Lord, if my brother sins against me, how often must I forgive?  As many as seven times?”  Jesus answered, “I say to you, not seven times but seventy-seven times.  That is why the kingdom of heaven may be likened to a king who decided to settle accounts with his servants….a debtor was brought before him who owed him a huge amount…Moved with compassion the master of that servant let him go and forgave him the loan. When the servant left, he found one of his fellow servants who owed him a much smaller amount…he had the fellow servant put in prison until he paid back the debt.  His master summoned him and said to him, ‘You wicked servant! I forgave you your entire debt because you begged me to.  Should you not have had pity on your fellow servant, as I had pity on you? Then in anger his master handed him over to the torturers…So will my heavenly Father do to you, unless each of you forgives your brother or sister from your heart. 

Reflection: 

Forgiving another-not focusing on our hurt or the other’s transgression but on the lovableness of the other-is so difficult! The challenge of this gospel is to forget how others have behaved toward us and look to God’s way of loving and forgiving us.  Our focus must be on God. Without God’s example we probably couldn’t forgive very well.  The challenge is to forget about ourselves so we can reach out to the other.  (Living Liturgy, p. 236)

Vincentian Meditation: 

“Because Jesus took our misery upon Himself, it is only reasonable that we should follow and imitate His holy, human life….Filled with consolation and happiness at the thought of being accepted by Him to live my entire life as His follower, I resolved that in everything, particularly in uncertain or questionable circumstances, I would consider what Jesus would have done…All the actions and the entire life of the Son of God are only for our example and instruction…”- St. Louise de Marillac- (Gibson and Kneaves, Praying with Louise, p. 55) 

Discussion:  (Share your thoughts on the readings after a moment of silence)

Jesus told us that we must forgive others “from our heart.”  Who needs your forgiveness?

Closing Prayer: 

Come, Lord of Healing and Unity, we are in need of Your divine help,

-help us to find a way to peace and understanding.

Let our hearts be ready to see Your way of loving and forgiving.

-may we be servants of pardon and make us as forgiving as You.  Amen

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Vincentian Reflections: Feast of Bl. Frederic Ozanam, September 9, 2020 https://stvincentdayton.org/vincentian-reflections-feast-of-bl-frederic-ozanam-september-9-2020/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=vincentian-reflections-feast-of-bl-frederic-ozanam-september-9-2020 Wed, 09 Sep 2020 10:00:20 +0000 https://stvincentdayton.org/?p=7326 Gospel: (Luke 10: 25-37)  “And who is my neighbor?  Jesus replied: “There was a man going down from Jerusalem to Jericho who fell in with robbers.  They stripped him, beat him, and then went off leaving him half-dead.  A priest happened to be going down the same road; he saw him but continued on.  Likewise […]

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Gospel: (Luke 10: 25-37) 

“And who is my neighbor?  Jesus replied: “There was a man going down from Jerusalem to Jericho who fell in with robbers.  They stripped him, beat him, and then went off leaving him half-dead.  A priest happened to be going down the same road; he saw him but continued on.  Likewise there was a Levite who came the same way; he saw him and went on.  But a Samaritan who was journeying along came on him and was moved to pity at the sight.  He approached him and dressed his wounds, pouring in oil and wine as a means to heal. He then hoisted him on his own beast and brought him to an inn, where he cared for him.  The next day he took out two silver pieces and gave them to the innkeeper with the request: “Look after him, and if there is any further expense I will repay you on my way back.”  Which of these three, in your opinion, was neighbor to the man who fell in with the robbers?”  The answer came,The one who treated him with compassion.” Jesus said to him, “Then go and do the same.”  

Reflection: 

“The humanity of our days seems comparable to the traveler of whom the Gospel speaks…in our turn, weak Samaritans, worldly and people of little faith that we are, let us dare nonetheless to approach this great sick one.  Perhaps it will not be frightened of us. Let us try to probe its wounds and pour in oil, soothing its ear with words of consolation and peace; then, when its eyes are opened, we will place it in the hands of those whom God has constituted as the guardians and doctors of souls, who are also, in a way, our innkeepers in our pilgrimage here below, so as to give our errant and famished spirits the holy word for nourishment and the hope of a better world for a shield.” –Bl.Frederic Ozanam-  (Ramson,  Praying with Frederic, p. 82)  

Discussion: (Share your thoughts on the readings after a moment of silence) 

Frederic does not call Christians “good Samaritans,” as one would expect, but “weak Samaritans.”  How are you in your Conference, indeed weak human beings who attend to other weak human beings by acts of compassion?                                                                                                              

Closing Prayer: A Litany in Honor of Blessed Frederic Ozanam

Frederic Ozanam, defender of faith, pray for us.

Frederic Ozanam, promoter of hope, pray for us.

Frederic Ozanam, apostle of charity, pray for us.

Frederic Ozanam, exemplary husband and father, pray for us.

Frederic Ozanam, lover of poverty and the poor, pray for us.

Frederic Ozanam, advocate of the dignity of the human person, pray for us.

Frederic Ozanam, servant of the truth, pray for us.

Frederic Ozanam, model for Catholic teachers and professors, pray for us.

Frederic Ozanam, disciple of St. Vincent De Paul, pray for us.

Frederic Ozanam, faithful son of the Church, pray for us.

Frederic Ozanam, our intercessor at the throne of God, pray for us. Amen

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Vincentian Reflections: September 6, 2020 https://stvincentdayton.org/vincentian-reflections-september-6-2020/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=vincentian-reflections-september-6-2020 Sun, 06 Sep 2020 10:00:40 +0000 https://stvincentdayton.org/?p=7324 Gospel: (Matthew 18:15-20)  Jesus said to his disciples: “If your brother sins against you, go and tell him his fault between you and him alone. If he listens to you, you have won over your brother. If he does not listen, take one or two others along with you, so that every fact may be […]

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Gospel: (Matthew 18:15-20) 

Jesus said to his disciples: “If your brother sins against you, go and tell him his fault between you and him alone. If he listens to you, you have won over your brother. If he does not listen, take one or two others along with you, so that every fact may be established on the testimony of two or three witnesses. If he refuses to listen to them, tell the church.  If he refuses to listen even to the church, then treat him as you would a Gentile or a tax collector….Amen, I say to you, if two of you agree on earth about anything for which they are to pray, it shall be granted to them by my heavenly Father. For where two or three are gathered together in my name, there am I in the midst of them.” 

Reflection: 

Giving and receiving corrections is one of the hardest things we can do.  Some strong motivation usually has to be present in order for corrections to be given or received and true reconciliation take place. There may be many motivations: to save face personally, to pleases another, to get another to change behavior that simply annoys us, etc. The last line of the gospel gives us a clue as to what underlying motivation is really the strongest: “For where two or three are gathered together in my name, there I am in the midst of them.”  Our strongest motivation urging us to charitable correction is the fact that we share a common identity of being the body of Christ.  We ourselves aren’t the reconcilers; it is the power of Christ action through his body. (Living Liturgy, p. 232)

Vincentian Meditation: 

People had often reproved Vincent for his harsh, almost driven streak, and commented about his steep mood swings. Defensive, Vincent would argue that he was the way he was and could not change.  But during one intense period of prayer, Vincent threw himself on God’s mercy, recognizing at last that only God’s power could calm his harshness and ease his sharp mood swings. Many years later, Vincent recounted this crucial moment: “I turned to God and earnestly begged him to convert this irritable and forbidding trait of mine. I also asked for a kind and amiable spirit. And with the grace of Our Lord, by giving a little attention to checking the hot-blooded impulses of my personality, I have been at least partly cured of my gloomy disposition.” (McKenna, Praying with Vincent, p.68-69.) 

Discussion:  (Share your thoughts on the readings after a moment of silence) 

Do we need to confront some unchristian behaviors in our Conference? 

Closing Prayer:                                                                     

Lord, where two or three are gathered in your name, be in our midst,

           – and give us the grace to give and receive corrections.

            Lord, give us the grace to pray for our own conversion,

– so that we will have the kind and amiable spirit of Vincent.  Amen

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Vincentian Reflections: August 30, 2020 https://stvincentdayton.org/vincentian-reflections-august-30-2020/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=vincentian-reflections-august-30-2020 Sun, 30 Aug 2020 10:00:51 +0000 https://stvincentdayton.org/?p=7322 Gospel: (Matthew 16:21-27)  Jesus said to his disciples: “Whoever wishes to come after me must deny himself, take up his cross, and follow me. For whoever wishes to save his life will lose it, but whoever loses his life for my sake will find it. What profit would there be for one to gain the […]

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Gospel: (Matthew 16:21-27) 

Jesus said to his disciples: “Whoever wishes to come after me must deny himself, take up his cross, and follow me. For whoever wishes to save his life will lose it, but whoever loses his life for my sake will find it. What profit would there be for one to gain the whole world and forfeit his life? Or what can one give in exchange for his life? For the Son of Man will come with his angels in his Father’s glory, and then he will repay all according to his conduct.” 

Reflection: 

Lose life and find life. Cross and glory. This is the paschal mystery in a nutshell. Sometimes our response to living the paschal mystery is enthusiastic because things are going well and we don’t realize the demands.  Then, when the going gets rough, we bog down.  The challenge is to let go so God can lead us. We need to surrender ourselves. The paschal mystery isn’t just a concept; it is a turning of the heart toward God’s love working in us, but not without its demands. Even sharing in Jesus’ divine glory means that we must share in his sufferings and death. (Living Liturgy, p. 228)

Vincentian Meditation: 

“Service to God’s people demands a price. Christians must put aside their own prejudices, comfortable circumstances, and favorite ideas in order to do the will of God. This sort of discipline calls Christians to die to themselves in order to follow Christ. St. Vincent called this discipline mortification. Mortification, or dying to self, has sometimes become confused with self-hate, repression…or co-dependency. However, dying to self is a core value in the Christian Testament. St. Vincent believed that mortification had to be a conscious choice. With the grace of God, people could be willing to make the hard sacrifices that love demands. With God’s help, they could detach themselves from—or die—to all that was not Christ so that they could put on Jesus Christ.  (McKenna, Praying with Vincent, p.83, 85)

Discussion:  (Share your thoughts on the readings after a moment of silence)

In what ways have you been called to mortification—“to deny yourself, and take up your cross”? 

Closing Prayer: 

Lord Jesus, give us the grace to deny ourselves,

-so that we can lose our life in order to find it.

Lord Jesus, give us the grace to carry our cross,

-so that we can learn mortification in the spirit of St. Vincent. Amen                                

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Vincentian Reflections: August 23, 2020 https://stvincentdayton.org/vincentian-reflections-august-23-2020/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=vincentian-reflections-august-23-2020 Sun, 23 Aug 2020 10:00:00 +0000 https://stvincentdayton.org/?p=7320 Gospel: (Matthew 16: 13-20)  Jesus asked his disciples, “Who do people say that the Son of Man is?” They replied, “Some say John the Baptist, others Elijah, still others Jeremiah or one of the prophets.” He said to them, “But who do you say that I am?” Simon Peter said, “You are the Christ, the […]

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Gospel: (Matthew 16: 13-20) 

Jesus asked his disciples, “Who do people say that the Son of Man is?” They replied, “Some say John the Baptist, others Elijah, still others Jeremiah or one of the prophets.” He said to them, “But who do you say that I am?” Simon Peter said, “You are the Christ, the Son of the living God.” Jesus said to him, “Bless are you, Simon son of Jonah. For flesh and blood has not revealed this to you, but my heavenly Father.  And I say to you, you are Peter, and upon this rock I will build my church… I will give you the keys to the kingdom of heaven.  Whatever you loose on earth shall be loosed in heaven.”

Reflection: 

Jesus revealed himself to Peter through his experience where, in spite of his doubt, fear, and sinking, he was saved from the raging seas. Peter had a gripping and personal experience of the saving power of Jesus, and so answers from a faith stance that Jesus is indeed the Christ, the Son of the living God.  Peter had paid attention to his experience, and so the “heavenly Father”could reveal to him the knowledge that Jesus was the long awaited Messiah. When we open our eyes to see and ears to hear and our hearts to experience Jesus’ presence and power in our daily lives, God’s revelation comes to us. We only need to have faith. (Living Liturgy, p.224) 

Vincentian Meditation: 

A friend wrote about Frederic: “He has the sacred fire.  There is such an air of interior conviction in this man, that without the appearance of doing so, he convinces and moves you.” Frederic’s sacred fire was faith.  Faith for Frederic Ozanam was indeed a living reality that permeated his entire being; it was his “second sight.”  Yet it was a hard-won gift.  Frederic attributes the foundation of his faith to his parents. “In the midst of an age of skepticism, God gave me the grace to be born in the true faith.  As a child I listened at the feet of a Christian father and a saintly mother.”(Ramson, Praying for Frederic, p.49) 

Discussion: (Share your thoughts on the readings after a moment of silence) 

How or to whom do you attribute your faith? 

Closing Prayer:

            O Father, you reveal to us that Jesus is you Son,

-deepen our faith to see you in the events of our lives.

            We pray for all parents,

may they guide their children in the ways of faith.

            Give us the sacred fire of Frederic,

that our faith will have his interior conviction.

            When Jesus asks us, “Who do you say that I am?”

                       -may we answer with Peter, “You are indeed the Christ. Amen

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Vincentian Reflections: August 16, 2020 https://stvincentdayton.org/vincentian-reflections-august-16-2020/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=vincentian-reflections-august-16-2020 Sun, 16 Aug 2020 10:00:25 +0000 https://stvincentdayton.org/?p=7318 Gospel:  (Matthew 15: 21-28)  A Canaanite woman called out, “Have pity on me, Lord, Son of David! My daughter is tormented by a demon.”…Jesus said, “I was sent only to the lost sheep of the house of Israel.” But the woman came and did Jesus homage, saying, “Lord, help me.”  He said, “It is not […]

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Gospel:  (Matthew 15: 21-28) 

A Canaanite woman called out, “Have pity on me, Lord, Son of David! My daughter is tormented by a demon.”…Jesus said, “I was sent only to the lost sheep of the house of Israel.” But the woman came and did Jesus homage, saying, “Lord, help me.”  He said, “It is not right to take the food of the children and throw it to the dogs.”  She said, “Please, Lord, for even the dogs eat the scraps that fall from the table of their masters.” Then Jesus said to her in reply, “O woman, great is your faith!  Let it be done for you as you wish.”  And the woman’s daughter was healed from that hour. 

Reflection: 

What is the deeper significance of these apparently harsh words of Jesus?  The answer lies in Jesus’ clear understanding of his mission, to the house of Israel.  This woman was not a Jew, and  she is thus challenging Jesus to extend his mission beyond Israel to include all people.  This foreign woman gives us a model response to Jesus in her confident prayer and great faith.  Thus the Gospel announces that the kingdom and salvation are for all people. It is our persistent calling out to Jesus and our faith that count for Jesus always responds.  (Living Liturgy, p. 220)

Vincentian Meditation: 

Vincent reminded the women in one of his charitable organizations, that it is Divine Providence that calls Christians to be creative in forming communities of service.  He told them, “It has been 800 years now since women have had any public role in the Church. In early times there were deaconesses…but this custom stopped and your sex was deprived of providing all these kinds of services.  In our day, however, this same Providence prompted you to take up the crucial work of caring for the poor…God has given you as mothers to the abandon children…and call upon you to dispense many alms. By the grace of God, these good women have responded to these needs with great warmth and steadiness.”  (McKenna, Praying with Vincent, p. 103-4) 

Discussion: (Share your thoughts on the readings after a moment of silence) 

            How have women been a grace to the Society?  What gifts and services have they brought to your Conference? 

Closing Prayer: 

O God, as you call us to serve the poor may we

-also be evangelized by those we serve.

Grant us the grace to be open to the gifts of women in the Church,

-may our words and actions bear witness to Jesus.

Give us the faith and courage of the Canaanite woman,

-so that we may be true servants of the gospel. Amen.

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Vincentian Reflections: August 9, 2020 https://stvincentdayton.org/vincentian-reflections-august-9-2020/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=vincentian-reflections-august-9-2020 Sun, 09 Aug 2020 10:00:56 +0000 https://stvincentdayton.org/?p=7316 Gospel:  (Matthew 14:22-33)  When Jesus fed the people, he made the disciples get into a boat and precede him to the other side, while he dismissed the crowds.  After doing so, he went up on the mountain by himself to pray.  When it was evening he was there alone. Meanwhile the boat, already a few […]

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Gospel:  (Matthew 14:22-33) 

When Jesus fed the people, he made the disciples get into a boat and precede him to the other side, while he dismissed the crowds.  After doing so, he went up on the mountain by himself to pray.  When it was evening he was there alone. Meanwhile the boat, already a few miles offshore, was being tossed about by the waves, for the wind was against it. During the fourth watch of the night, he came toward them walking on the sea. When the disciples saw him walking on the sea they were terrified. “It is a ghost,” they said, and the cried out in fear. At once Jesus spoke to them, “Take courage, it is I; do not be afraid.”  Peter said to him in reply, “Lord, if it is you, command me to come to you on the water.” He said, “Come.” Peter got out of the boat and began to walk on the water toward Jesus.  But when he saw how strong the wind was he became frightened; and, beginning to sink, he cried out, “Lord, save me!” Immediately Jesus stretched out his hand and caught Peter, and said to him, “O you of little faith, why did you doubt?” 

Reflection: 

This gospel does show Jesus as having authority over the waters: he walks on the sea and at his will the wind dies down. Nevertheless, this gospel is less about Jesus manifesting power in great events that it is an invitation to respond to Jesus, to come to him. We follow Jesus not because he is a great miracle worker but because he is the “Son of God.”  It is far easier to come to Jesus in the obvious things; for example, faithful attendance at Mass. It is far more difficult to see God in the little things; for example, being pleasant when the poor are demanding, or giving back to a cashier too much change, or giving extra time to be present to children or spouse. (Living Liturgy, p.212) 

Vincentian Meditation:           

When the disciples were terrified, Jesus immediately responded to them: “Take courage, it is I; do not be afraid.” Jesus is interested always in trying to lighten our fears. When he comes to us in Holy Communion, he assures us that he is giving us everlasting life. That is a great assurance because the greatest natural fear which we have is the fear of death. Jesus can take care of that greatest natural fear, namely death, and he will also take care of those many other smaller fears which are hidden in our hearts. Some of these fears are known to us, others are not. To us, however, as to the frightened disciples, Jesus keeps saying: “Take courage, it is I; do not be afraid. (McCullen, Deep Down Things, p. 735)

Discussion: (Share your thoughts on the readings after a moment of silence) 

When have you heard Jesus say to you: “Take courage, it is I; do not be afraid.”? 

Closing Prayer:

Lord Jesus, in our fears and anxieties, may we always hear you say,

“Take courage, it is I; do not be afraid.” Amen.

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Vincentian Reflections: August 2, 2020 https://stvincentdayton.org/vincentian-reflections-august-2-2020/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=vincentian-reflections-august-2-2020 Sun, 02 Aug 2020 10:00:09 +0000 https://stvincentdayton.org/?p=7314 Gospel:  (Matthew 14: 13-21)  When Jesus saw the vast crowd, his heart was moved with pity for them…When it was evening, the disciples approached him and said, “This is a deserted place and it is already late; dismiss the crowds so that they can go to the villages and buy food for themselves.” Jesus said: […]

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Gospel:  (Matthew 14: 13-21) 

When Jesus saw the vast crowd, his heart was moved with pity for them…When it was evening, the disciples approached him and said, “This is a deserted place and it is already late; dismiss the crowds so that they can go to the villages and buy food for themselves.” Jesus said: “There is no need for them to go away; give them some food yourselves. But they said, “Five loaves and two fish are all we have here.”  Then he said, “Bring them here to me,” …Taking the five loaves and two fish, and looking up to heaven, he said the blessing, broke the loaves, and gave them to the disciples, who in turn gave them to the crowds.  They all ate and were satisfied…when they picked up the fragments left over they had twelve baskets full.  Those who ate were about five thousand… 

Reflection: 

This gospel helps us move all the talk about God’s kingdom out of the scripture and into our daily lives.  We can’t make the kingdom present by ourselves.  At first, Jesus tells the disciples to “give them some food yourselves.” They can’t; human resources are not sufficient to make present what God’s kingdom promises.  Jesus then takes the meager human resources- “five loaves and two fish”- and blesses them and gives them to disciples to distribute to the crowds.  What the disciples cannot do alone they can do with Jesus’ blessing. (Living Liturgy, p.208) 

Vincentian Meditation:           

“We must pass, …from affective love to effective love.  And that is a love which takes flesh in works of charity, service of the poor which is undertaken with joy, constancy and tender love.”-St. Vincent de Paul- ( McKenna, Praying with Vincent, p. 64) 

Discussion: (Share your thoughts on the readings after a moment of silence) 

How have you witnessed in your service to the poor that your “loaves and fishes” were multiplied by the blessing of Jesus? 

Closing Prayer: 

Lord Jesus, you bless those who seek to serve the poor,

-move our hearts from affective to effective love.

Open our eyes,

that we may see your presence in our midst.

Open our ears,

-that we may hear the cries of the poor.

Open our hearts,

-that we may serve with joy, constancy and tender love.

Open our hands,

            -that our “loaves and fishes” may receive your blessing. Amen.

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Vincentian Reflections: July 26, 2020 https://stvincentdayton.org/vincentian-reflections-july-26-2020/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=vincentian-reflections-july-26-2020 Sun, 26 Jul 2020 10:00:43 +0000 https://stvincentdayton.org/?p=7312 Gospel: (Matthew 13: 44-52)  Jesus said to his disciples: “The kingdom of heaven is like a treasure buried in a field, which a person finds and hides again, and out of joy goes and sells all that he has and buys that field.  Again, the kingdom of heaven is like a merchant searching for fine pearls.  […]

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Gospel: (Matthew 13: 44-52) 

Jesus said to his disciples: “The kingdom of heaven is like a treasure buried in a field, which a person finds and hides again, and out of joy goes and sells all that he has and buys that field.  Again, the kingdom of heaven is like a merchant searching for fine pearls.  When he finds a pearl of great price, he goes and sells all he has and buys it…” 

Reflection: 

The demand of daily Christian living is to spend our life primarily searching for the kingdom of God.  In the Gospel, first the person who finds the buried treasure in a field comes upon it by happenstance; the find just happens without effort; it is pure gift.  The role of discipleship is to become aware of the treasure when it is found.  Second, the merchant knows his or her business and recognizes the prized pearl when it is found.  The role of discipleship here is to be diligent in the search, not become discouraged and give up,  seek until the “pearl of great price” is found. (Living Liturgy, p. 204)

Vincentian Meditation: 

“To be servants of the poor…O Mon Dieu! What a lovely title and what a beautiful description! Servants of the poor, that is just the same as to say  Servants of Jesus Christ, for He regards as done to Himself what is done to them, and they are His members.   And what did He do whilst on earth, but serve the poor?”–St. Vincent de Paul- (McKenna, Praying with Vincent, p.42)

Discussion: (Share your thoughts on the readings after a moment of silence.) 

To hear the call to serve the  poor is like finding the “treasure in the field” or “the pearl of great price”.  How did you join the Society-by searching or did someone invite you?       

Closing Prayer: 

Loving God, thank you for grace of finding the “pearl of great price, in the poor,

-may we serve you in the most destitute.

In every age you call new disciples to follow Christ,

-lead men and women to serve the poor within the Society.

Give us strength to stand in solidarity with those who suffer,

-may our hearts be filled with compassion and love.

            Give us the grace to be true “Servants of the Poor”,

Servants of Jesus Christ.  Amen

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